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#41 [url]

Feb 7 14 7:43 AM

Deinotherium wrote:
Here's another view of Puyol, doesn't seem gorged to me.
aa5026381f30e924f685b86b4e086e061d95f71b

Yes, the lion doesn’t look “gorged”, but the article that you present here suggest it.

 

One explanation could be that in the moment of the picture, the lion exhaled its breath, so the “wide” part of his body was only meal in the stomach, but I am only speculating here.

 

If you check my list of East African lions, there are several specimens which stomach content is unknown, especially the larger ones. So, there will be no problem in including him. However, I will like that lion-fans use this same criteria, after all I am not “mad” in using a “full of beef” lion, but if I used the fans criteria, I should exclude it immediately, even if at the end, a 25% of food in a lion or tiger is simple impossible and constitute an exaggeration.

 

Maximum food intakes of up to 33 kg (East African lions), 35 (Nepal tigers) and 43 (Crater lions) are EXCEPTIONAL CASES, NOT THE NORM. I don’t understand why hard-core-lion-fans like Asad or Starfox insist in misinform the people that this are normal cases (especially in the tigers) and that even quantities of up to 50 kg can be ingested in a 24 hours! smiley: sick  THIS IS IDIOCY!!!smiley: mad

 

A normal meal for a tiger in 24 hours will be between 14-19 kg on average and there is only one exceptional case of a tiger eating up to 35 kg. The figure of 45 kg is the hypothetical case of a tiger eating a maximum of 1/5 of its own weight.

 

I assume that this is the same case for lions, with normal meals between 10-18 kg. The figures of 5-7 kg in a day are just the amount necessary for this cat in a day, not they actual food intake in 24 hours.

 

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Deinotherium

Posts: 14 Member Since:relative

#42 [url]

Feb 7 14 7:51 AM

The researcher who darted and measured Puyol clearly isn't sure (in fact she has no idea whatsoever) if Puyol has recently eaten or not. I suspect she only mentioned the 25% food intake because she was amazed by the weight and trying to find an explanation, in this case the "recently eaten" explanation fitted best. But there's no indication that this lion has any food contents at all.

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#43 [url]

Feb 7 14 8:15 AM

Deinotherium wrote:
The researcher who darted and measured Puyol clearly isn't sure (in fact she has no idea whatsoever) if Puyol has recently eaten or not. I suspect she only mentioned the 25% food intake because she was amazed by the weight and trying to find an explanation, in this case the "recently eaten" explanation fitted best. But there's no indication that this lion has any food contents at all.


In that case, it is safe to say that even “if” it had some stomach content, the animal was not “gorged” and its weight reflect the normal body mass of a lion with a normal stomach content between meals.

 

Like I said to you, the figure of 235 kg will be quoted in my table, although its true weight empty belly was probably lower than that (probably 220 kg?).


Finally, let's take in count also that she mentioned. This is what she said:

Puyol is some of the largest lion I’ve ever seen; his tail base as thick as my arm, and he weighs (if we can trust a non-perfect scale) around 235 kg. Mind you, perhaps 25% of that was his latest large meal.

 

There are two factors here, a “latest large meal” and a “non-perfect scale”. The weight of "around" 235 kg may be reliable, but certainly it is not from a “empty belly” animal.

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#44 [url]

Feb 7 14 9:36 AM

Size of the East African lion – NEW table!

Here is my new table (2014) about the size of the East African lions (males only):

image

 

I added the new weights reported and made a few corrections on the texts. Copy it and save it for future references.

 

Greetings to all. smiley: smile

 

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#45 [url]

Mar 7 14 9:27 AM

Hello everyone, guess what? I have buy the book of "The story of the Asia's lions"!!!

Yes, It came to me about the 20 of this month. I will have the opportunity to compare this book (edition of 2006) with that of Valmik Thapar (Exotic Aliens, of 2013) in order to see which of them had more evidence about the origin of the "Indian" lions.

By the way, I have completed the data of the size of the Indian lions. I will make a table just like that of the East African lions. Stay here for my next posts.

Greetings to all. smiley: smile

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#46 [url]

Mar 24 14 8:47 PM

Body size of East African lion – the truth

Hello to all, I present to you the final tables, augmented and with a review, about the body size of male and female African lions at the East of the continent.

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PDF document: http://www.scribd.com/doc/214211740/Valvert-2014-Body-Size-East-African-Lion

 

As we can see, the average weight overall is of c.174 kg for males and c.121 kg for females. This figures match perfectly with the previous figures from Smut et al. (1980) which stated an average weight of c.175 kg for males and c.120 kg for females. This will rest the case that East African lions are the middle size population, been smaller than those of Southern Africa but larger than those in West Africa and India (Barbary lions of the same size).

 

Please take in count that the extreme weights of 180 kg for the females could include some stomach content. At this moment, I have not corroborated it yet, but I hope to do it soon.

 

I advise you to erase the previous tables and use these new ones, which are corrected with the final overall average (to avoid confusions). The date is different and the data too. You can also save the PDF to your database.

 

Greetings to all. smiley: smile

 

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#47 [url]

Mar 25 14 10:41 PM

Canned lions, an INTERNATIONAL disgrace!!!

I have found this page: http://endtrophyhuntingnow.com/2014/03/13/global-march-on-15th-march-against-canned-lion-hunting/

 

Check how this practice is destroying the wildlife and reduce the life of an animal, like the great lion, to a simple trophy!!! smiley: sick

 

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Check that ALL these huge lions that normally hard-core-lion-fans use to show that lions are large in the wild, are in fact CANNED lions, breed in private facilities just for the sake of a “good” hunt (put this in your liar head, Asad).

 

This is sick in every sense, and we must take in count that these farms are now offering the opportunity to hunt tigers and jaguars!!! smiley: tired

 

Please, help to stop this practice, which is already an international disgrace. smiley: mad

 

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#48 [url]

Mar 29 14 1:04 AM

Great work on the lion study Guate. I find the lioness masses very interesting, the results are about the same as mentioned by Schaller in his book.

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